Sugar Act and Stamp Act

Parliament in the 1700's

The Sugar Act and Stamp Act were passed in Parliament

This article on the Sugar Act and Stamp Act in Colonial America provides fast facts and information about the effects of these important laws and taxes. 

  • What were the Sugar Act and Stamp Act?
  • The Definition of the Sugar Act and Stamp Act
  • The purpose and importance of the Sugar Act and Stamp Act
  • The effect and significance of the Sugar Act and Stamp Act
Sugar ActStamp Act
Stamp Act CongressTaxation in the Colonies
American Colonies Index

History of the 13 Colonies and the laws & taxes that sparked rebellion against the British

The definition and purpose of the Sugar Act and Stamp Act and the cry of "No taxation without representation!"

Definition of the Stamp Act of 1765

The Meaning and Definition of the Stamp Act: The Stamp Act of 1764 was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain,

The Stamp Act of 1765 was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain on  February 6th, 1765, during the reign of King George III during the ministry of George Grenville (Lord Grenville), the British Chancellor of the Exchequer.

The Stamp Act was designed to raise revenue from the American colonists in all of the 13 Colonies.

The Stamp Act set a duty, or tax, in the form of a stamp required on all newspapers, legal and commercial documents.

Stamps showing that the Stamp Act had been paid

 

Cutting Sugar Cane

Definition of the Sugar Act of 1764
The Meaning and Definition of the Sugar Act: The Sugar Act of 1764 was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain

The Sugar Act of 1764 was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain on  February 6th, 1765, during the reign of King George III during the ministry of George Grenville (Lord Grenville), the British Chancellor of the Exchequer.

The Act set a tax on sugar and molasses imported into the colonies which impacted the manufacture of rum in New England. The Sugar Act also taxed additional foreign goods including wines, coffee, cambric and printed calico. Timber and iron were included in the products that could be traded only with England.

 

Sugar Act and Stamp Act - Background Information
The definitions of the two Acts show that the enactment of the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act were both British Laws that were passed by parliament during the reign of King George III and instigated by the government led by Lord Grenville. The Sugar Act was passed in 1764 and the Stamp Act was passed a year later in 1765. Both were designed to raise revenue for the British. But the reaction by the colonists to the Acts was very different. The Sugar Act was resented by many of the colonists but did not result in the violent opposition that greeted the Stamp Act. Why? This article provides important information and facts about each of the two Acts and highlights the similarities and differences between them. An example of the differences are:

  • The Sugar Act was designed to regulate commerce and trade especially in the New England region.
  • The Stamp Act was the first direct tax on domestically produced and consumed items. It was unrelated to trade and it affected every single colonist across the Southern colonies, Middle colonies and the New England colonies

The Stamp Act Congress was called to discuss the grievances of the colonists. The following Sugar Act and Stamp Act Fact file highlights important factors, effects and significance of these British Acts. A list of 20 important facts about these laws.
 

The Sugar Act and Stamp Act Fact File

 Facts about the similarities and differences between the Sugar Act and Stamp Act
FactsThe Stamp Act The Sugar Act
Fact 1

The year the British Stamp Act was passed 1765. The Stamp Act called for the taxing of 54 separate items
 

 The year the British Sugar Tax was passed was 1764.
Fact 2

The Stamp Act was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain
 

 The Sugar Tax was a British Law, passed by the Parliament of Great Britain
Fact 3

The Stamp Act was passed during the reign of King George III
 

 The Sugar Tax was passed during the reign of King George III
Fact 4

The Stamp Act was instigated by the British government led by Lord Grenville
 

 The Sugar Tax was instigated by the British government led by Lord Grenville
Fact 5

The Stamp Act was designed to was designed to raise revenue from all of the American colonists
 

 The Sugar Tax was designed to raise revenue primarily from the New England colonies
Fact 6

Documents taxed included newspapers, liquor licences, legal documents, calendars. almanacs, certificates, diplomas, contracts, wills, pamphlets, Bills of Sale and Licences
 

 Sugar and molasses were taxed (impacting the manufacture of rum). Foreign imports of goods to the colonies were taxed including wines, coffee, cambric and printed calico. Timber and iron were included in the products that could be traded only with England
 
Fact 7

The documents were not merchandise and required different rates of Stamp Act ranging from penny up to 10.
 

 Taxes were set at standard rates per item of merchandise
Fact 8

The Stamp Act was the first direct tax on domestically produced and consumed items
 

 The Sugar Tax was aimed at regulating trade and  commerce
Fact 9

The French and Indian War was a victory for the British but they were left with a massive war debt of 130 million pounds. One of the reasons the Stamp Act was introduced was to clear the war debt, the  other was to finance British troops in the colonies
 

 The same reasons
Fact 10

The Stamp Act Stamps had to be paid with 'hard currency' (silver or gold coins) and not in paper money, which was the most common form of payment in the colonies - also refer to Colonial, Continental and Revolutionary Currency
 

 Merchandise was traded rather than bought and sold. The premise of Triangular Trade was that the different regions would trade goods that they had in abundance in exchange for those goods which were scarce in their own region
 
Fact 11

There was no Trial by Jury for anyone who offended the Stamp Act - cases were heard in the Admiralty Courts. There was no trial by jury in the Admiralty Courts. Cases were decided by judges rather than juries. All colonists were involved
 

 British admiralty courts were used for tax violators, smugglers and for the seizure of cargoes violating the new rules. The Act gave customs agents more power and latitude with respect to executing seizures and enforcing customs law - the majority of colonists would not have been involved
 
Fact 12

The colonists violent, widespread, reaction to the Stamp Act came as a great surprise to the British government and also to the Americans
 

 The Sugar Tax was received with limited protests from specific sections in the colonies - the colonists had accepted and become accustomed, to a limited degree, to the British regulation of trade and taxes
 
Fact 13

The colonists believed that the Stamp Act was a deliberate attempt to reduce their authority in the internal government of the colonies
 

 The Sugar Tax was viewed as a tax relating to trade and commerce and not directly related to the internal affairs of the colonies
Fact 14

The Stamp Act was introduced by a direct order from Britain without approval of the colonial legislature
 

 The same for the Sugar Tax
Fact 15

The law united the colonists in New England, the Middle and the Southern colonies - the Stamp Act effected every colonist, unlike previous taxes
 

 The colonists were not united in their protests
Fact 16

The high taxes on lawyers and college students were designed to limit the growth of a professional class in the American colonies
 

 Professional people were not targeted by the tax
Fact 17

Young, well educated, hot-headed students felt particularly aggrieved by the Act and as with all young men enjoyed the excitement of the protests
 

 Students were not effected by the law
Fact 18

The Stamp Act led to the first concerted effort by the American colonists to resist the British Parliament and the authority of Great Britain and the creation of resistance groups such as the Sons of Liberty
 

 No real efforts were made to resist the British Parliament
 Fact 19

Opposition to the Act was led by the most influential and persuasive segments of colonial society. These men were most affected by the Act and included lawyers, publishers, clergymen, journalists, land owners, ship builders and merchants
 

 There were no leaders who were united against the Sugar Act
 Fact 20

The Stamp Act led to outrage, anger, resentment, protests, dissension and ultimately to the American Revolutionary War and the Declaration of Independence from Great Britain.
 

 The Sugar Act was initially greeted quietly - but added fuel to the fire of revolution
FactsFacts about the similarities and differences between the Sugar Act and Stamp Act

The Sugar Act and Stamp Act Fact File

  

Colonial America - The Land of the Brave

 

Sugar Act and Stamp Act - British Policies, Laws and Taxes
The combination of the Sugar Act and the Stamp Act, so closely enacted, started the colonists down the Road to Revolution.. But the road had already been mapped by British polices including the policies of:

Mercantilism
Triangular Trade
Salutary neglect

The Acts passed before the Sugar Act and Stamp Act that added fuel to the fire of revolution were:

The Navigation Acts
Wool Act
Hat Act
Debt Recovery Act
Iron Act

Discover interesting  facts and information about the Taxes in the 13 Colonies, and the Revolutionary Timeline, including the Sugar Act and Stamp Act, which was imposed on the colonists of Colonial America by the British government via parliament. The Sugar Act and Stamp Act was one of a series of taxes that divided Great Britain and its colonies in America and one of the Causes of the American Revolutionary War.

Declaration of Independence

The Sugar Act and the Stamp Act - The Declaration of Independence

 

Sugar Act and Stamp Act

  • Meaning and Definition of the Sugar Act and Stamp Act
  • History of the Act of 1764
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Colonial America - The Land of the Brave

 

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